Oct 05 1945

 



557876 Tpr. Hallam, J.H.,

G.S.C. Depôt, ( Cook ),

Whittington Barracks,

Litchfield,

Staffs..

Oct. 5. 1945.

My Darling,

I was happy to get a letter from you this morning, it was a good idea getting the address of this place before we came here wasn't it.

We started work this morning, at 5.30 am and worked till one o'clock, it is quite a pleasure working in the cook house everything is clean and tidy, not like the one we have just left, it was a dirty place, the A.T.S. Had been cooking there, and their cooking was stone age according to the men who had to eat it.

I have not seen much of the camp up to writing, but it is very large place, all brick buildings you know, it was a peace time station for troops I believe. We did find the post office last night though, it is quite an imposing building too.

I have been continually singing the song “don't fence me in”, this morning, it suits this place fine, we are 3½ miles to the nearest very small town, right out in the moors: what a place.

I must write to Stoke today too, and give them my new address, or they will begin to think I have neglected them.

Well darling, I hope this letter finds you both well and happy, I am very well, but not really truly happy, I never will be till I am with you again.

Give my regards to all I know, I hope Miss Hardwick is enjoying good health.

Till we meet again my dear, you have all my love; darling mine, I remain always,

Yours Ever,

Henry. X X X

X X X X X X X X XX X X X X X X X XXX

Nurse L.M.Cooper,

Nurses Home,

City General Hospital,

Sheffield, 5.


Note

Don't Fence Me In (song)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



Don't Fence Me In is a popular American song with music by Cole Porter and lyrics by Robert Fletcher and Cole Porter.



Originally written in 1934 for Adios, Argentina, an unproduced 20th Century Fox film musical, "Don't Fence Me In" was based on text by a poet and engineer with the Department of Highways in Helena, Montana, Robert (Bob) Fletcher. Cole Porter, who had been asked to write a cowboy song for the 20th Century Fox musical, bought the poem from Fletcher for $250. Porter reworked Fletcher's poem, and when the song was first published, Porter was credited with sole authorship. Porter had wanted to give Fletcher co-authorship credit, but his publishers did not allow that. After the song became popular, however, Fletcher hired attorneys who negotiated his being given co-authorship credit in subsequent publications. Although it was one of the most popular songs of its time, Porter claimed it was his least favorite of his own compositions.


The Fletcher poem used would seem to be "Open Range," contained in his 1934 book Coral Dust. The final couplet is "And turn me loose on my cayuse, But please don't fence me in." Apart from that, the rest of the lyrics appear to be Cole's invention, unless he utilized other material from the book.[2]

[edit] Cover versions


Ten years later, in 1944, Warner Bros. resurrected "Don't Fence Me In" for Roy Rogers to sing in the movie, Hollywood Canteen. Many people heard the song for the first time when Kate Smith introduced it on her radio broadcast of October 8, 1944. "Don't Fence Me In" was also recorded by Bing Crosby and The Andrews Sisters in 1944. Crosby entered the studio on July 25, 1944, without having seen or heard the song. Within 30 minutes, he and The Andrews Sisters had made the recording, which later sold over a million copies and topped the Billboard charts for eight weeks in 1944-45.



Also made famous by the original "Singin' Cowboy" Gene Autry and also Willie Nelson with Leon Russell

[edit] Roy Rogers and Don't Fence Me In


The following year, the song was sung again as the title tune of another Roy Rogers film, Don't Fence Me In (1945), in which Dale Evans plays a magazine reporter who comes to Roy Rogers' and George "Gabby" Hayes' ranch to research a story which she is writing about a legendary late gunslinger. When it's revealed that Gabby Hayes is actually the supposedly dead outlaw, Roy must clear his name. Rogers and The Sons of the Pioneers also find time to perform some songs, including the Cole Porter title tune.




"Don't Fence Me In" Lyrics.



Oh, give me land, lots of land under starry skies above,

Don't fence me in.

Let me ride through the wide open country that I love,

Don't fence me in.

Let me be by myself in the evenin' breeze,

And listen to the murmur of the cottonwood trees,

Send me off forever but I ask you please,

Don't fence me in.


Just turn me loose, let me straddle my old saddle

Underneath the western skies.

On my Cayuse, let me wander over yonder

Till I see the mountains rise.


I want to ride to the ridge where the west commences

And gaze at the moon till I lose my senses

And I can't look at hovels and I can't stand fences

Don't fence me in.


Oh, give me land, lots of land under starry skies,

Don't fence me in.

Let me ride through the wide open country that I love,

Don't fence me in.

Let me be by myself in the evenin' breeze

And listen to the murmur of the cottonwood trees

Send me off forever but I ask you please,

Don't fence me in


Just turn me loose, let me straddle my old saddle

Underneath the western skies

On my Cayuse, let me wander over yonder

Till I see the mountains rise.

Ba boo ba ba boo.


I want to ride to the ridge where the west commences

And gaze at the moon till I lose my senses

And I can't look at hobbles and I can't stand fences

Don't fence me in.

No.

Poppa, don't you fence me in